Intentional Incompetence

I cannot come to any other conclusion than that the current administration intentionally scattered the children stolen from their families in a manner that would make reunification difficult or impossible. Which is the very situation we are in now.

Part of my career related to designing and using complex databases for research data. A database to keep track of which child belonged to which parent would be extremely easy to create and use. The only technical part would be a method to identify each child and parent. A simple identification bracelet such as those used in hospitals would work. Indeed, from a video the government shared of these holding facilities, you can see such a bracelet being scanned as each child is given his food tray.

It could not be more self evident that such a system would be needed if you were to separate children from their parents. Since this was not done, it had to be a deliberate decision not to do so.

This entire debacle is sinister. Since when do we allow the government to prevent reporters and congressional representatives from seeing where these children are kept? Since when has the government brought children into cities without notifying the local authorities? Since when has the government lied to airlines about who is being transported? Since when have children been ripped from their parents in the first place, causing all these problems?

This is obviously unacceptable. Those responsible need to be held accountable.  Those responsible need to be removed from their positions so they cannot do further damage. We need to speak out. There are too many parallels to taking Jewish people or Japanese Americans to concentration camps while others remained silent. Too many parallels to young African American men either killed or imprisoned here.

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2 Responses to Intentional Incompetence

  1. lizopp says:

    Remember to include the ugly history of the US government removing children frim Native American families and placing them in white families—that was fairly recent too, the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA).

    And all of this is embedded in the founding of this country, when white land-owning Christian men wrote the earliest laws of the land and began to define whiteness as superior. Jacqueline Battalora (spelling?) has written and spoke quite a bit about this, as an online search will point to videos and writings. I think “Birth of a White Nation” is a key term she uses.

    Your grief and despair is palpable in this post, Jeff. May it stir you, myself, and many others into right action, such as advocacy, bystander intervention training, new relationship with those who are most impacted, etc. And may we ourselves be more about connection and healing in our activities and thoughts.

    Blessings,
    Liz, The Good Raised Up

  2. Kathleen J. Hall says:

    Jeff and Liz – thank you for your article and comment. As a mother, grandmother, and for 30 years a teacher of “at risk” preschoolers in Iowa (where I worked with whole families), I am appalled at these actions. The attachment between parent and child is the first and most important relationship every child has; these children will bear the results of this hideous act all their lives.

    However, after spending hours on the phone, e-mail, facebook, and on the street, I feel for perhaps the first time what I did mattered. Our representative and senators were bombarded with protests, which they passed on to Trump and I think influenced his ending the program.

    Now we can’t let our government forget that these children and parents must be re-united, and that our immigration “policy” must change, must recognize the right of asylum to escape violence, including domestic, and treat everyone with respect. I plan to visit all three local offices Monday.

    It might also be time to recognize how US actions in Central America have contributed to the violence that people are fleeing from. Surely we bear a special responsibility to them.

    Kathy Hall, Whittier

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