Scattergood Journal–May/June, 1970

Journal, May 26, 1970

I have been reading about civil disobedience lately. Many people set up all sorts of criteria to judge what is civil disobedience and what is not.  One of the most important ideas, to me, though, was that there are times when civil disobedience is the only alternative when a man refuses to be corrupted. These may be the times when we are born again, when we lose life in order to find it. Becoming a Christian requires a radical change in one’s everyday life and attitudes, and I have felt confronted with a choice of taking this way or rejecting it in regard to the draft question. I believe civil disobedience to be necessary, to be positive, and in this case perhaps even to instigate a rebirth.

There are times, often perhaps, when I am not sure. I don’t have all of the logical rational arguments figured out. And yet this is where real faith comes in, I believe. You can pray noon and night and hope someday to receive an answer. Maybe that’s faith.

I believe faith to be the sustaining factor that, when confronted with a difficult decision, supports you when you choose to follow the path that your heart says is right but your mind has not yet figured out, or perhaps is not capable of figuring out. The consequences are most uncertain, but you can endure them if you keep the faith.

June 16, 1970

I saw a television program this evening. A Jewish social worker had a cousin, head of a prosperous business and apparently a devote Jew. It eventually came out that the businessman owned some housing in the ghetto the social worker lived in.

The boy cried. “You told me all about the history and life of the Jews, and you don’t do any of those things.”

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